Quagga and Zebra Mussels Close in on New Mexico

Quagga and Zebra Mussels Close in on New Mexico

From the January 2016 newsletter New Mexico is on the verge of an invasion of nonnative plant and animal species that threaten the health and quality of our waters. Although New Mexico is only one of 6 states in the Continental US with no evidence of infestation, Zebra and Quagga Mussels have been found in lakes and streams of all our neighboring states, most recently the Quagga mussel has been found in the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam at Lee’s Ferry. We all will need to play our part in helping to avoid their spread.  If you ... Read More
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El Niño Visits New Mexico

From the January 2016 newsletter A warming trend in the Pacific has spawned a wet season for the Southwest, including New Mexico. Every one of the state’s river basins have an above-average snowpack, according to the initial water supply forecast by the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Last year, the snowpack was well below 100 percent in most of New Mexico’s mountain ranges. December’s snowfall pushed precipitation totals for the month to 137 percent of the 30-year average. December marked the first time that New Mexico was reported as drought-free on the drought monitor map compiled by agencies that keep track ... Read More
Animas River Update

Animas River Update

Nearly two months after the Gold King mine spill, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish biologists say fish caught in sections of the Animas and San Juan rivers are safe to eat. Immediately following the spill, the department issued a catch and release recommendation. However, recent tissue samples from fish revealed only trace amounts of metals that are within acceptable levels for human consumption. The department will continue collecting and testing species of fish. Collections will be taken again at six months post spill, one year post spill and then annually. Link to NM Game & Fish announcement ... Read More
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NMDGF Stocking Larger Trout

From the August/September 2015 Newsletter The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish (NMDGF) has been executing a program to stock larger fish in local waters over recent years. The aim of the program that grows larger trout at several of its hatcheries is to keep anglers excited about the sport. The idea for the program came from the tremendous positive responses the department has received from anglers who had caught big trout, stocked in numerous fishing areas during the past few seasons. Many of those fat trout were the first generation raised at the Los Ojos Fish Hatchery after ... Read More
Browns

Browns

by Jerry Burton, NMT President
from the December 2014 Newsletter The Vivegash fire in 2000 burned approximately 38,000 acres in the headwaters of Cow Creek. While some of the headwaters tributaries were not devastated by the fire, it did wipe out most of Cow Creeks’ trout population. After a few years the stream slowly was repopulated with Rio Grande cutthroats, cut-bows, rainbows, and brook trout that had managed to survive the fire in a few small headwater streams. None of these small headwater streams contained brown trout. I started to guide at the Cow Creek Ranch in April of 2004, ... Read More
Trip Report: Fishing the Rio Chama Below El Vado Dam

Trip Report: Fishing the Rio Chama Below El Vado Dam

by Ron Loehman
From the October/November 2014 Newsletter Earlier this year I was the successful bidder in an on-line auction for a guided fishing trip donated to the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance. I redeemed the award in late October for a trip on the Rio Chama below the El Vado dam, guided by Noah Parker, the trip donor and owner of Land of Enchantment (LOE) Guides. Noah is a long-time friend and supporter of New Mexico Trout, who many of our members know through his contributions to our Conclave and through trips they have taken with him. I had never ... Read More
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Cowles Fishing Reopens 

Cowles Ponds in the upper Pecos Canyon 20 miles north of Pecos are open to the public again, featuring a ramp and path designed for people who use wheelchairs. The ponds were closed The ponds were closed for improvements, which included draining and dredging to improve fish habitat. The project cost more than $380,000 and was paid for with funding from the state Habitat Stamp program, federal money and local donations. The ponds are periodically stocked with rainbow trout by the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish. One 12-foot-deep pond was built for children under age 11 and people with disabilities. The other pool is 8 ... Read More